Small critters with big stories
The Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard, Volume 2 by David Petersen, Stan Sakai, Bill Willingham, Rick Geary, Ben Caldwell, Nick Tapalansky, Paul Morrissey, Rebecca Taylor, Corey Godbey, Eric Canete, and Alex Eckman-Lawn (Archaia Entertainment, $19.95)
The Mouse Guard series has been a big winner for creator David Peterson, as an ever-expanding universe of mouse-based legend captivates graphic novel fans young and old. The premise is that mouse civilization has reached a medieval stage and the Mouse Guard exists to protect the villages and cities of the mouse territories.
In this second volume of the Legends of the Guard series of anthologies, a number of writers and artists step in to try their hand at a tale of mouse derring-do. The most recognizable of these is, of course, Bill Willingham, the creator of the Fables series. The stories themselves are enthralling, and it’s always interesting to see what the various styles do with the mice—and their accoutrements. It takes on a “Canterbury Tales” feel, which is not a bad thing, and would make a good entry point into the series.

Small critters with big stories

The Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard, Volume 2 by David Petersen, Stan Sakai, Bill Willingham, Rick Geary, Ben Caldwell, Nick Tapalansky, Paul Morrissey, Rebecca Taylor, Corey Godbey, Eric Canete, and Alex Eckman-Lawn (Archaia Entertainment, $19.95)

The Mouse Guard series has been a big winner for creator David Peterson, as an ever-expanding universe of mouse-based legend captivates graphic novel fans young and old. The premise is that mouse civilization has reached a medieval stage and the Mouse Guard exists to protect the villages and cities of the mouse territories.

In this second volume of the Legends of the Guard series of anthologies, a number of writers and artists step in to try their hand at a tale of mouse derring-do. The most recognizable of these is, of course, Bill Willingham, the creator of the Fables series. The stories themselves are enthralling, and it’s always interesting to see what the various styles do with the mice—and their accoutrements. It takes on a “Canterbury Tales” feel, which is not a bad thing, and would make a good entry point into the series.

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